The Scouting Trail - Norman Rockwell 1939 
Are there other troops in Holliston?
Troop 76 is one of three Boy Scout troops in the Town.  The other troops are Troop 73 and Troop 14.
 
What are the expectations of the boys?
The troop meets twice a month and usually has one or two other activities each month.  Activities can include camping trips or service projects.  Attendance is encouraged but we are very aware of the busy schedules in our kid’s lives these days.
 
What is "Boy Scouting"?
Scouting is unlike anything your son has ever experienced before.

 Unlike school, organized sports, or perhaps even in the home setting, in a Boy Scout troop the youth are the ones who are in charge. THEIR desires become our agenda. THEIR ideas for adventure, fun, and excitement are what the adults guide them to bring into reality. In Scouting, THEY speak and the adults listen.

 By practicing representative democracy, they pick their own leaders who form the "Patrol Leader Council" that creates the yearly agenda. Scouts work together on every issue, from what to eat at camp, deciding who will wash dishes and shop for food, they learn and PUT INTO PRACTICE communication, public speaking, teamwork, conflict resolution, and leadership.

 By taking advantage of any of the 130 possible merit badges, they gain exposure to areas of interest ranging from Rifle Shooting to Chemistry, from Small Boat Sailing to Aviation, and from Reading to Nuclear Science. Statistically, the Merit Badge program often leads to life-long hobbies and even career choices. At a minimum, Merit Badges help a young man try things he may never have had a chance to do if not for the Scouting experience, such as rifle shooting, archery, sailing, or camping.

 While boys are busy "being Scouts" and having fun, they start to embody the virtues of Scouting defined in the Scout Oath and Law.

 What is Scouting? It's "fun with a purpose".

What do boys do as "Boy Scouts"?

The Boy Scout Of America Program is a 101 year old, professionally crafted, program of education and character development. By using the "Outdoor Method" (camping, fishing, rock climbing, etc) boys work together to do "the things boys like to do". In the process, they learn the value of teamwork, honesty, communication, mutual respect, and more as they work towards their goal and overcome any obstacles they encounter.

 By employing the Methods of Scouting, we reinforce the AIMS of Scouting, which are reflected in our Oath and Law. The goal is to see that they become permanant fixtures in the character of each Boy Scout as we teach them to be Trustworthy, Loyal, Helpful, Friendly, Courteous, Kind, Obedient, Cheerful, Thrift, Brave, Clean, and Reverent.

 Most boys get to do things and go places they would have never had the opportunity to do if not for being involved in Scouting.

 Ever climb the highest peak east of the Rockies?
 Ever swim under the largest waterfall in Maryland?
 Ever spend 5 days canoeing down the Missouri River?
 Ever try shooting rifles, shot guns, and bow & arrows?
 Ever try biking 50+ miles at a time along the C&O canal?
 Ever try fishing? How about fly-fishing?
 Ever cook over an open fire?
 Ever spend the night in a tent? How about an "emergency shelter" you created in the woods?
 Ever see the stars from parts of Maryland where there's no "light pollution"?... a sky so clear you can see the Milky Way?

 WE HAVE !

 

What do you mean by "Boy Led"?

A Boy Scout troop leads itself. Adults are present to guide and ensure safety & compliance exists, but it is the YOUTH who make key decisions. The primary role of the Scoutmaster is to teach the Senior Patrol Leader how to run/lead his troop.

 The Scouting program using The Patrol Method means the Troop members ELECT their own leaders; individual Patrol Leaders and a Senior Patrol Leader (SPL) who takes on "ownership" and hold the actual leadership position within the Troop. The SPL appoints an assistant scout (Assistant Senior Patrol Leader - ASPL) and various other leadership positions, all of whom serve at the Scoutmaster's discretion.

 While serving as Senior Leaders, the SPL and ASPL cease to be members of their respective patrols and function as peers with the adult leadership. The SPL and ASP execute Program decisions, lead the meetings, plan agendas, pick camping destinations, and LEAD BY EXAMPLE when executing the agenda that the boys themselves created and agreed to follow.

 Patrol Leaders are responsible for the well being and actions of their individual patrol and will REPRESENT their patrol in the Patrol Leaders Council (PLC).

 At the PLC meeting (chaired by the SPL and monitored by the Scoutmaster or Assistant Scoutmaster), Patrol Leaders plan future trips and troop meetings. Through a model of Representative Government, they CHOOSE the trips and activities THEY want to do, and appoint other scouts to serve as skill instructors, or lead games or other activities. Adult leadership keeps them on track with suggestions and advice, but the decisions are ultimately left to THE BOYS.

 Once the future meetings/camping trips are planned, the SPL and Scoutmaster present the PLC's plans to the Troop Committee for review. The agenda is checked for issues such as necessary fund raising, unique equipment/skills, camp ground reservations, and is given an over-all inspection to confirm that trips are aligned with the purpose of the Scouting Program. If the plans are approved, and the weekly meetings are lead by the boys (as designed) unless the skill instruction needed is currently beyond the skill set of the Scouts, or relates to merit badge requirements, then adults will render assistance.

ADULTS are a RESOURCE for guidance and ensuring that things are done the "BSA way" for safety, youth development and general direction setting.

 "Boy Leadership" really means the Troop is doing the things the BOYS THEMSELVES want to do, and in doing so, will develop the leadership, communication, problem resolution, and organizational skills that underscore why Scouts excel in all other areas of their lives.

 

 

 

 

The Scouting Trail - Norman Rockwell 1939 
Are there other troops in Holliston?
Troop 76 is one of three Boy Scout troops in the Town.  The other troops are Troop 73 and Troop 14.
 
What are the expectations of the boys?
The troop meets twice a month and usually has one or two other activities each month.  Activities can include camping trips or service projects.  Attendance is encouraged but we are very aware of the busy schedules in our kid’s lives these days.
 
What is "Boy Scouting"?
Scouting is unlike anything your son has ever experienced before.

 Unlike school, organized sports, or perhaps even in the home setting, in a Boy Scout troop the youth are the ones who are in charge. THEIR desires become our agenda. THEIR ideas for adventure, fun, and excitement are what the adults guide them to bring into reality. In Scouting, THEY speak and the adults listen.

 By practicing representative democracy, they pick their own leaders who form the "Patrol Leader Council" that creates the yearly agenda. Scouts work together on every issue, from what to eat at camp, deciding who will wash dishes and shop for food, they learn and PUT INTO PRACTICE communication, public speaking, teamwork, conflict resolution, and leadership.

 By taking advantage of any of the 130 possible merit badges, they gain exposure to areas of interest ranging from Rifle Shooting to Chemistry, from Small Boat Sailing to Aviation, and from Reading to Nuclear Science. Statistically, the Merit Badge program often leads to life-long hobbies and even career choices. At a minimum, Merit Badges help a young man try things he may never have had a chance to do if not for the Scouting experience, such as rifle shooting, archery, sailing, or camping.

 While boys are busy "being Scouts" and having fun, they start to embody the virtues of Scouting defined in the Scout Oath and Law.

 What is Scouting? It's "fun with a purpose".

What do boys do as "Boy Scouts"?

The Boy Scout Of America Program is a 101 year old, professionally crafted, program of education and character development. By using the "Outdoor Method" (camping, fishing, rock climbing, etc) boys work together to do "the things boys like to do". In the process, they learn the value of teamwork, honesty, communication, mutual respect, and more as they work towards their goal and overcome any obstacles they encounter.

 By employing the Methods of Scouting, we reinforce the AIMS of Scouting, which are reflected in our Oath and Law. The goal is to see that they become permanant fixtures in the character of each Boy Scout as we teach them to be Trustworthy, Loyal, Helpful, Friendly, Courteous, Kind, Obedient, Cheerful, Thrift, Brave, Clean, and Reverent.

 Most boys get to do things and go places they would have never had the opportunity to do if not for being involved in Scouting.

 Ever climb the highest peak east of the Rockies?
 Ever swim under the largest waterfall in Maryland?
 Ever spend 5 days canoeing down the Missouri River?
 Ever try shooting rifles, shot guns, and bow & arrows?
 Ever try biking 50+ miles at a time along the C&O canal?
 Ever try fishing? How about fly-fishing?
 Ever cook over an open fire?
 Ever spend the night in a tent? How about an "emergency shelter" you created in the woods?
 Ever see the stars from parts of Maryland where there's no "light pollution"?... a sky so clear you can see the Milky Way?

 WE HAVE !

 

What do you mean by "Boy Led"?

A Boy Scout troop leads itself. Adults are present to guide and ensure safety & compliance exists, but it is the YOUTH who make key decisions. The primary role of the Scoutmaster is to teach the Senior Patrol Leader how to run/lead his troop.

 The Scouting program using The Patrol Method means the Troop members ELECT their own leaders; individual Patrol Leaders and a Senior Patrol Leader (SPL) who takes on "ownership" and hold the actual leadership position within the Troop. The SPL appoints an assistant scout (Assistant Senior Patrol Leader - ASPL) and various other leadership positions, all of whom serve at the Scoutmaster's discretion.

 While serving as Senior Leaders, the SPL and ASPL cease to be members of their respective patrols and function as peers with the adult leadership. The SPL and ASP execute Program decisions, lead the meetings, plan agendas, pick camping destinations, and LEAD BY EXAMPLE when executing the agenda that the boys themselves created and agreed to follow.

 Patrol Leaders are responsible for the well being and actions of their individual patrol and will REPRESENT their patrol in the Patrol Leaders Council (PLC).

 At the PLC meeting (chaired by the SPL and monitored by the Scoutmaster or Assistant Scoutmaster), Patrol Leaders plan future trips and troop meetings. Through a model of Representative Government, they CHOOSE the trips and activities THEY want to do, and appoint other scouts to serve as skill instructors, or lead games or other activities. Adult leadership keeps them on track with suggestions and advice, but the decisions are ultimately left to THE BOYS.

 Once the future meetings/camping trips are planned, the SPL and Scoutmaster present the PLC's plans to the Troop Committee for review. The agenda is checked for issues such as necessary fund raising, unique equipment/skills, camp ground reservations, and is given an over-all inspection to confirm that trips are aligned with the purpose of the Scouting Program. If the plans are approved, and the weekly meetings are lead by the boys (as designed) unless the skill instruction needed is currently beyond the skill set of the Scouts, or relates to merit badge requirements, then adults will render assistance.

ADULTS are a RESOURCE for guidance and ensuring that things are done the "BSA way" for safety, youth development and general direction setting.

 "Boy Leadership" really means the Troop is doing the things the BOYS THEMSELVES want to do, and in doing so, will develop the leadership, communication, problem resolution, and organizational skills that underscore why Scouts excel in all other areas of their lives.

 

 

 

 

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